HENDRIX: Why did Jimi Hendrix stop playing with Mitchell and Redding?

Gary Gomes, Current Musician, Vedic Astrologer at Self-Employment Noel was a guitar player first and actually thought he was auditioning for the New Animals. Hendrix hired him mainly because he liked his hair! In fairness to Redding, he actually did a very good job for Hendrix considering his lack of experience (pun intended). Redding actually […]

Read More

SLASH: Q&A

  “Slash, 45, was born Saul Hudson in London and raised in England and Los Angeles. He was an original member of the rock band Guns N’ Roses which formed in 1985 and sold 100m albums worldwide. Slash – considered one of the greatest rock guitar players of all time – left Guns N’ Roses […]

Read More

PROGRESSIVE ROCK: Why is it so unpopular?

Alexander Musarra writes … Let me first generalize pop music. Popular music generally focuses on having a good, danceable groove, and a simple, melodic hook. Popular music is also relatively short, 3 minutes being average. Harmonically they are generally diatonic (within the major scale) with little, if any modulations (change of key). Progressive rock, on […]

Read More

Did a band ever break up on stage?

Muiris writes … Although it had previously been announced by Paul Weller, much to the surprise of bassist Bruce Foxton & drummer Rick Buckler, the Jam officially broke up at the end of their final concert at the Brighton Conference Center on the 11th December 1982. It would be 20 years before bassist Bruce Foxton […]

Read More

BEATLES: During the Let it Be sessions, it appears that they recorded mostly live. How did they hear themselves? I don’t see any headphones, etc in use.

Michael D Mirne writes … This is actually a very good question and unfortunately, the previous answers all avoided the essence of the question. We know that even studio recordings that do not have overdubs still require some isolation of tracks. Otherwise, the drum mics would pick up the guitar amps, and the guitar mics […]

Read More

NIRVANA: How did Nevermind change American music?

Lance LaSalle writes … It didn’t change music, it changed popular culture. Suddenly certain fashions and styles of music that were confined to rather limited social underground scenes became fashionable. At the time, I was wearing a lot of hand-me-down flannel shirts; I had a pointy chin beard and I had questionable hygiene. I deliberately […]

Read More

BLUE OYSTER CULT: Why didn’t they become a mega band like Black Sabbath, Journey, Aerosmith, and other groups with similar talent? Were they just too science fictiony?

Ramakrishnan Parthasarathy answers here: No garage punk, proto-punk or punk rock band (or, to take it even further: no rock band) wrote better and more memorable riffs than Blue Oyster Cult. No one had a more intriguing sound that was dirty when required and deliciously evil at will. In fact, the best of Blue Oyster […]

Read More

Did Jimi Hendrix really memorize The Beatles’ ‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’ two days after it was released?

Alex Johnston writes … Yes. It was actually three days after the album’s release that Hendrix played it at a concert in the Saville Theatre. Memorising it, incidentally, is a feat well within the powers of even a middling rock musician. ‘Sgt Pepper’ the song isn’t exactly complicated, and Hendrix—a hugely gifted rock musician—had been […]

Read More

THE LOVIN’ SPOONFUL: Whatever happened to them?

Erich Ising: The Lovin’ Spoonful is an American rock band which was popular during the mid-to late-1960s. Founded in New York City in 1965 by lead-singer/songwriter John Sebastian and guitarist Zal Yanovsky, it is best known for a number of hits which include “Summer in the City”, “Do You Believe In Magic”, “Did You Ever […]

Read More