CLAUDIO ABBADO: A celebration

This week on the Gramophone website we are celebrating the career and recordings of the great Italian conductor Claudio Abbado. Among the highlights of Abbado Week are two different guides his finest recordings, a comprehensive overview of Abbado’s career and heartfelt tribute from Gramophone’s Editor-in-Chief James Jolly, and a classic interview with Abbado drawn from […]

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CHOPIN: Piano Concertos (Benjamin Grosvenor)

“I haven’t been this struck by the orchestral expositions to Chopin’s concertos since Jun Märkl with the Scottish Chamber Orchestra for Ingrid Fliter. Now in the company of another Scottish orchestra, the RSNO, Elim Chan makes equally bold decisions about how the music should go. It’s easy to understand why they ….. ” Continues HERE

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Debussy: The Complete Works review – a comprehensive and invaluable survey

Andrew Clements writes ….. he most significant musical anniversaries of 2018 are all centenaries – of the births of Leonard Bernstein and Bernd Alois Zimmermann, and of the death of Claude Debussy, and it’s the last of those, which falls in March, that is attracting the attention of record companies. Warner Classics has got in […]

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BENJAMIN BRITTEN: Britten to America – video interview with Sir Mark Elder

Gramophone Magazine: As his centenary year draws to a close, we can look back at some wonderful new recordings of Britten’s music: Philip Hingham’s disc of the Cello Suites (Delphi an), Oliver Knudsen conducting The Rape of Lucretius at Aldeburgh (Virgin Classics), Ian Bostridge recording Britten’s songs with Antonio Pappano and Xuefei Yang (EMI Classics), […]

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BEETHOVEN: How his symphonies changed the world

Phillip Clark writes: Ludwig van Beethoven, the composer who, more than any other, changed music, the sound of music and what it is that composers do, wrote nine symphonies that jolted music out of itself. Life could never – would never – be the same again. The “classical” rationality of structure, harmony, form, melodic development […]

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Antonio Vivaldi’s Four Seasons

by Aaron Green Updated October 23, 2017 Vivaldi’s Four Seasons concerto is unmistakably Antonio Vivaldi’s most famous work. Outside of the concert hall, you’ve heard movements of Vivaldi’s Four Seasons in movies like Tin Cup, Spy Game, A View to Kill, What Lies Beneath, White Chicks, Saved!, Pacific Heights, and The Other Sister just to name a few. You’ve heard it […]

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Christopher Breunig / Britten and Shostakovich. Rudolf Kempe and the BBC Symphony Orchestra

Internationally respected authority on classical music, Mr. Christopher Breunig returns to this site. First, a little about him: Christopher trained and practiced as an architect, but over the years contributed music reviews to various publications, including the Sunday Times, Guardian and other specialist journals including International Piano and Classic Record Collector. Britten and Shostakovich It’s […]

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POULENC: A composer who deserves greater recognition. fifty years after his death, Poulenc deserves a better anniversary showing, says Ivan Hewett

  From the archives: It’s a bumper year for composer anniversaries. There’s the 100th anniversary of the birth of Benjamin Britten, fabulously gifted and with something odd and dark that fascinates us. There’s the 200th of Giuseppe Verdi, musical voice of an entire nation. And there’s also the 200th of Richard Wagner, one of those […]

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MOZART: Piano Concertos Performed by Jan Lisiecki

  Anthony Tommasini writes ….. Jan Lisiecki, pianist; Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Christian Zacharias. Deutsche Grammophon B0016888-02; CD. The pianist Jan Lisiecki, born in Canada to Polish parents, was 16 when he made this debut recording for Deutsche Grammophon and 17 when he made his debut with the New York Philharmonic in December. […]

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KOMITAS: A new sound world: discover the piano music of Komitas

  Simon Broughton talks to pianist Lusine Grigoryan about her new Komitas recording on ECM Ask someone to name an Armenian composer and the first name on the list is likely to be Aram Khachaturian, famous for his Gayane and Spartacus ballet scores. But for Armenians, their most treasured composer is Komitas (1869-1935), often described […]

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