OPINIONS / MUSIC

An ever-changing industry grows and blooms

Martin Cullingford writes: Every year, around this time, I report back from the annual gathering of the classical industry at the Classical:NEXT conference. Bringing labels, distributors, innovators and artists together always breeds good ideas, goodwill and a better, shared understanding of where, as an industry, we are heading. Year after year, the constant is the […]

Read More

BRAHMS: The Symphonies (3 cd)

  We are told: The Boston Symphony Orchestra and Andris Nelsons are pleased to release their latest recordings on BSO Classics–a three-disc set of the four Brahms symphonies, recorded live during concert performances at Symphony Hall in November 2016, engineered by the same in-house team that produced the BSO’s Grammy-winning Shostakovich recordings under Maestro Nelsons […]

Read More

RAVEL: Daphnis et Chloé with François-Xavier Roth

The conductor explores Ravel’s Daphnis et Chloé and explains his novel approach to his new recording The new recording of Ravel’s complete Daphnis et Chloé by Les Siècles, Ensemble Aedes and François-Xavier Roth was an Editor’s Choice in the June issue, with Gramophone’s Mark Pullinger particularly beguiled by their novel use of ….. Continues HERE

Read More

MOZART. LSO Wind Ensemble play ‘Gran Partita’

Mozart’s Serenade No 10 for Winds, ‘Gran Partita’, third movement, Adagio For many, the third movement of Mozart’s ‘Gran Partita’ Serenade will be forever associated with the film Amadeus, in which the rival composer Salieri is confronted by the full force of the simple genius of Mozart’s music. The London Symphony Orchestra’s Wind Ensemble released […]

Read More
Quill

A REALLY good listen via the BBC: Women in the Shadows: Joanna MacGregor (piano)

From the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, celebrated pianist Joanna MacGregor OBE begins this week of lunchtime concerts, highlighting unjustly neglected works alongside their more celebrated contemporaries. Sofia Gubaidulina: Chaconne Errolyn Wallen: I wouldn’t normally say Gabriela Ortiz: Suy-muy-key Stevie Wishart (arr MacGregor): Proem, Prelude and Fugue Freya Waley-Cohen: Southern Leaves Trad arr MacGregor: Sometimes I […]

Read More

STRAVINSKY: From 1910 to 1945, Stravinsky was the single strongest influence on contemporary music. His early ballets – The Firebird, Petrushka and The Rite of Spring – alone were enough to secure his place among the greats.

Stravinsky’s father sent him to study criminal law and legal philosophy at St Petersburg University in 1901. Through his friendship with Vladimir and Andrei Rimsky-Korsakov, two sons of the great composer, Stravinsky became a family friend and a frequent visitor to Rimsky’s house. With Feodor Stravinsky’s death in 1902, Igor began taking lessons (free of […]

Read More
OPINIONS / MUSIC

A to Z of Wagner: C is for Cosima

C is for Cosima Wagner; AKA Francesca Gaetana Cosima Liszt, illegitimate daughter of Franz Liszt; AKA Cosima von Bülow, wife of the conductor Hans von Bülow, who proved remarkably understanding when Cosima fell in love with the sexually rampant Wagner in 1863. Cosima was tall, aloof, beak-nosed, antisemitic and altogether a bit weird. According to […]

Read More
OPINIONS / MUSIC

JUDGE FOR YOURSELF: Pavarotti versus Corelli: who’s really king of the high Cs in Il Trovatore?

From the archives Tim Wong writes: I grew up listening to a recording of Verdi’s Il Trovatore my father bought. It’s the Franco Corelli version with Thomas Schippers conducting. I was instantly captivated by his heroic style and especially how he threw himself into the aria Di quella pira. In an extremely silly plot, it’s […]

Read More

Caccini: L’Euridice: Concerto Italiano/Alessandrini – review

Andrew Clements writes: No one would dispute that the first operatic masterpiece was Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo, which was first performed in Mantua in 1607. But establishing what should be regarded as the very first opera of all, who composed it, and what that work consisted of, is much less straightforward. It is hard to pinpoint precisely […]

Read More

BEETHOVEN: A List of Beethoven’s Music That Has Appeared in the Movies

by Aaron Green Updated November 13, 2017 Ludwig van Beethoven (1770–1827) is one of the world’s most famous and influential composers of classical music. His music has been played all over the world for two centuries. Even if you’ve never been in a concert hall, if you’ve seen a movie—any movie—in your life, chances are […]

Read More

OPEN-MINDED: The open-mindedness of the finest artists

Genre-hopping can enrich players and audiences alike. If anyone doubts the astonishing range and quality of classical music recordings being made today – and, I hope, regular readers of these pages would harbour no such perception – then they should really take heed of this month’s releases. There’s always a slight seasonality to release schedules, […]

Read More

Dvorák: Piano Trios Op 65 & 90 CD review – bursting with energy

Fiona Maddocks writes ….. The Trio Wanderer, now 30 years old, sounds as sparkling and zestful as ever in Dvorák’s infectious “Dumky” trio, Op 90, truly a work to lift spirits, though not without melancholy. The last of the composer’s works for the medium, it bursts with Slavonic dance rhythms and lyrical folk melody, wonderfully […]

Read More