JAZZ: The first jazz electric guitar?

In 1932, a musician called Gage Brewer began performing on one of the first electrically amplified Hawaiian guitars. The idea soon appealed to guitarists rendered almost inaudible in big swing bands, but six years passed before a jazz guitarist, George Barnes, first ….. MORE Epilogue Hi. I’m Tony Andrews and I am Contributing Editor / […]

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Modern day female jazz recommendations?

  We all know the classics from decades ago. What are your favorite your more contemporary female jazz singers of today?  Living close to Nashville I have the opportunity to see and hear a lot of up and coming artists. Nashville is NOT just country music by a long shot.  I’ll start with Diana Krall…. […]

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Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers – Rutgers University, N.J, April 15th 1969 (2CD)

Recorded live for FM broadcast in the spring of 1969, this superb set captures the legendary jazz drummer putting his band through their paces on a series of incendiary extended tracks. Featuring the young Woody Shaw on trumpet, as well as Carlos Garnett (tenor saxophone), George Cables (piano) and Scotty Holt (bass), it’s presented here […]

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Jazz Has Become The Least-Popular Genre In The U.S.

From our extensive jazz archives: David La Rosa writes: According to Nielsen‘s 2014 Year-End Report, jazz is continuing to fall out of favor with American listeners and has tied with classical music as the least-consumed music in the U.S., after children’s music. Both jazz and classical represent just 1.4% of total U.S. music consumption a piece. However, Classical […]

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The “One Drop Rule” of Jazz – by Seth Colter Walls

  As far as shameful cultural secrets go, the fact that African-American composers aren’t featured on our classical music stages as frequently as they should be is one few people bother keeping anymore. “That black composers are poorly represented in mainstream concerts is a germane topic of discussion but one beyond the scope of a […]

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JAZZ: A Crash Course in Jazz Appreciation

Brett & Kate McKay write: Jazz. It’s the music that many men say they like, but don’t actually know anything about. Which is a shame for a whole host of reasons. For starters, jazz has had a major influence on most popular music genres in the 20th century — rock, hip-hop, Latin…the list goes on […]

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Thelonious Monk / Sonny Rollins – Thelonious Monk & Sonny Rollins Vinyl LP Record

This is part of the Prestige Records 50th Anniversary Special Commemorative Edition series. These five tracks, recorded in the 1950s and reissued in 2006, feature Thelonious Monk and Sonny Rollins–two of the era’s most progressive musicians–on the stand together. The interplay between Monk’s skeletal, idiosyncratic, yet strangely logical playing and Rollins’s full, rich tone and […]

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Whatever happened to Hi-Fi Shows and the importance of both Patricia Barber and Radka Toneff?

Tony Andrews (contributing editor – jazz) writes: Back in the 1980 and 90s if you were in to Hi-Fi there were some great shows around in the London area. I can remember many happy hours spent at various locations near Heathrow and also at The Novotel in Hammersmith. As venue costs soared and demand dropped […]

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Wayne Shorter: one of the greatest saxophonists in history

Originally published November 2013 Ivan Hewett writes: Two great saxophone colossi have bestridden the London Jazz Festival (now the EFG London Jazz Festival) in recent years. One is Sonny Rollins, who despite health problems made a triumphant appearance at the 2012 festival, in his 83rd year. The other is Wayne Shorter, who turns 80 this […]

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A jazz supergroup collective comprised of four of the world’s top instrumentalists: Hudson (CD)

  We are told: ‘Hudson’ is the first album from a jazz supergroup collective comprised of four of the world’s top instrumentalists: Jack DeJohnette (drums), Larry Grenadier (bass), John Medeski (keyboardist of Medeski Martin & Wood) and John Scofield (guitar).In addition to original compositions, ‘Hudson’ features covers of songs connected to the Hudson Valley by […]

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Jonathan Gee Trio: Chez Auguste CD review by Tony Andrews

Tony Andrews, our contributing editor (jazz) writes: I firmly believe that UK jazz fans are getting more and more paranoid about musicians from anywhere other than the UK; that in some way, they are better musically or more inventive. This is especially so with musicians from The US where Jazz is thought to have been […]

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BILLIE HOLIDAY: Her 10 top songs?

BILLIE HOLIDAY, who died at 44, was born on April 7, 1915, and became one of the most influential singers of all time. Jazz trumpeter Trumpeter Bill Coleman said: “Billie Holiday sounded different from any female singer that I had heard before.” It’s an almost impossible task to pick out her 10 best songs. To […]

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Jazz Orrin Evans and the Captain Black Big Band: Presence review – hooky grooves and improv charm

Continues HERE Epilogue Hi. I’m Tony Andrews and I am Contributing Editor / Jazz here. I hope you found the above interesting. If you want anything jazz-related published here (free of charge) then please email me at tonya.balgores@talktalk.net and/or you can leave a message on +44(0) 7734 816 345 and I’ll see if it fits.  […]

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Phillip Johnston: Back From Down Under

Phillip Johnston is best known to many jazz fans as co-founder of Microscopic Septet, though the saxophonist and composer has led many groups of his own and co-led others, including Big Trouble, The Transparent Quartet, Fast ‘n’ Bulbous and The Spokes. In addition, Johnston has composed and performed numerous soundtracks for both silent and modern […]

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Kris Funn: Bass Player, Story Teller

Get the story HERE Epilogue Hi. I’m Tony Andrews and I am Contributing Editor / Jazz here. I hope you found the above interesting. If you want anything jazz-related published here (free of charge) then please email me at tonya.balgores@talktalk.net and/or you can leave a message on +44(0) 7734 816 345 and I’ll see if […]

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Roy Budd – “Get Carter” Theme

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8kMhcf8eyiA “Still one of the finest and beyond a doubt the coolest soundtrack to one of the best British films of all time Roy Budd’s theme from Get Carter is truly kick ass…from the bad ass bass riff to the tablas to the keyboards. The three keyboard instruments are a grand piano (with lots of […]

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Bram Weijters/Chad McCullough: Pendulum

By DAN MCCLENAGHAN Chicago-based trumpeter Chad McCullough and Belgian pianist Bram Weijters present Pendulum, the pair’s fifth recording together. Their discography includes three excellent quartet outings on Origin Records, including Urban Nightingale (2012), and a duo date, Feather (eyes&ears, 2017). Pendulum follows in Feathers’ footsteps to the extent of instrumentation, with Weijters wielding an array […]

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Art Blakey

Again, useful information HERE on a performer few of us here knew much about. Epilogue Hi. I’m Tony Andrews and I am Contributing Editor / Jazz here. I hope you found the above interesting. If you want anything jazz-related published here (free of charge) then please email me at tonya.balgores@talktalk.net and/or you can leave a […]

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Jazz: Verve Records helped spread jazz around the world

Verve Records was formed in 1955 by Norman Granz and their studio albums and live recordings by Ella Fitzgerald, Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie and Billie Holiday helped bring jazz to a world audience. Richard Havers writes “Jazz stirs the possibilities for creativity in the moment. Jazz is about the human character; jazz is about feeling, […]

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