There are no hard feelings on our part if they are returned

We wouldn’t need laws if everyone did the right thing. Unfortunately, people justify all kinds of behavior that’s socially unacceptable: greed, selfishness, every-man-for-himself, self-aggrandizing at the expense of others. We make laws and rules to even the playing field—then those same people spend their days figuring out how to work around them. An endless circular battle that benefits […]

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Elgar Rediscovered

Andrew Achenbach writes: Here’s another fascinating haul of historic Elgar recordings from Somm expertly compiled and restored by Lani Spahr. The 77-minute programme is launched in delectable fashion with the first-ever appearance of the composer conducting his own Op 58 Elegy with the strings of Adrian Boult’s magnificent BBC Symphony Orchestra. The April 1933 Abbey […]

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RICKIE LEE JONES: The interview

  Martin Chilton, Digital Culture Editor of The Telegraph writes ….. Asked what made her wish to record a whole album of cover songs, Rickie Lee Jones quips: “Money”. Joking aside, her selection of the 10 songs to interpret on her fine new album The Devil You Know is innovative and interesting. Tracks by the […]

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Pressed to the Edge: How vinyl hype is destroying the record

FACTMAG.COM: We have a problem. The music industry has been celebrating a surge of interest in one of its most beloved artifacts: the vinyl record. Major labels are returning to their old business model and are quickly saturating clothes stores, online shops, electronics outlets and international vinyl-themed holidays with reissues of old classics. It’s easy […]

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Why is the greatest choral music frequently the most difficult to sing?

‘The composers who break new choral ground are often those who are not so familiar with the medium’ Everyone in our business can identify the composers who ‘write well for voices’ – those who understand the singers’ need for breath, for movement between registers, and for periods of rest. Conventional wisdom maintains that the human […]

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1986-1991 The Warner Years (5CD Box Set) by Miles Davis

In 1985, Miles Davis shocked the music world by moving from Columbia to Warner Bros. He immediately started working on an album called ‘Perfect Way’ after a tune by Scritti Politti, later renamed ‘Tutu’ by producer Tommy LiPuma. When ‘Tutu’ was released in 1986, it re-ignited Miles Davis’ career, crossing over into the rock and […]

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JOHNNY WINTER: Raisin’ Cain (CD)

John Dawson Winter, III, known as Johnny Winter was an American blues guitarist. He was a multi-instrumentalist, singer and producer. Johnny was prominent session man and toured with Muddy Waters. Johnny is the brother of Edgar Winter. Sadly, Johnny passed away in 2014; Raisin Cain on CD. This was originally released in 1980. 1. The […]

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Hi Neil. Want to pass this thought to you “Think Soft Machine versus Motown.”

Really? Re Soft Machine, I sat through too many of their live tedious ramblings at too many 1960’s free gigs waiting for Pink Floyd as the headline act. There were murmuring that some hapless audience members would sooner bite their own heads off rather than sit through another experience. Mind you, the same was said […]

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Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young Déjà Vu

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RnOXkedBmRs Said one viewer: Definitely my favorite album…1st with Neil Young. The singing really hits it, esp. with “Carry On”, Country Girl”, “Woodstock” and “Everybody, I Love you” standing out (for me)…”4&20″ is another piece of silk, with Stephen Stills using an all-‘E’ tuning. All great stuff.

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ALAN PARSONS: What he thinks about audiophiles

In an interesting interview at CEPro, Alan Parsons, the man who engineered Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon and yes, had his own Project, says that room acoustics are far more important than audiophile gear. In fact, the interview led one Slashdot commenter to post this fine quip: “Audiophiles don’t use their equipment to […]

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WAGNER Parsifal (Fischer)

‘I was not thinking of the Redeemer when I created Parsifal’, wrote Wagner. In ceremonial moments stage director Pierre Audi and his team – including artist Anish Kapoor as set designer – rightly eschew any Christian symbolism deriving from latter-day Mass rituals, opting instead (in the first Grail scene) for images of blood and sacrifice. […]

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