Jazz Has Become The Least-Popular Genre In The U.S.

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David La Rosa writes:

According to Nielsen‘s 2014 Year-End Report, jazz is continuing to fall out of favor with American listeners and has tied with classical music as the least-consumed music in the U.S., after children’s music.

Both jazz and classical represent just 1.4% of total U.S. music consumption a piece. However, Classical album sales were higher for 2014, which puts Jazz at the bottom of the barrel.

This continues an alarming trend that has seen more and more listeners move away from jazz every year.

Album sales have long been a key measure of the popularity of individual genres, and year after year jazz album sales continue to fall.

In 2011, a total of 11 million jazz albums (CD, cassette, vinyl, & digital) were sold, according to BusinessWeek. This represents 2.8% of all music sold in that year. However, just a year later, in 2012, that percentage fell to 2.2%. It rose slightly to 2.3% in 2013 before falling once again to just 2% in 2014.

That 2% represents just 5.2 million albums sold by all jazz artists in 2014. In comparison, the best-selling artist of 2014, Taylor Swift, sold 3.7 million copies of her latest album ‘1989’ in the last 2 months of 2014 alone.

Almost 30% of all music consumed in the U.S. was classified as ...........

 

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Hi. I'm Tony Andrews and I am Contributing Editor / Jazz here. I hope you found the above interesting. If you want anything jazz-related published here (free of charge) then please email me at tonya.balgores@talktalk.net and/or you can leave a message on +44(0) 7734 816 345 and I'll see if it fits.  Thank you.

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