How Norway Funds A Thriving Jazz Scene

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Jan Bang performs a live remix at the Punkt Festival.

Michell Mercer writes as follows: Did you hear about the Italian gallery owner who last year — with the cooperation of the painters? It was a sort of desperate smoke signal to his government; a means of protesting funding cuts. If there haven't been similar protests in the U.S. lately, it could be because we're used to .

In today's strained environment for arts support, the funding wonderland of Norway can incite jealousy. Yes, Norway is an oil-rich country; it also allots a respectable percentage of its oil wealth to pioneering art, making it a model for exactly what well-spent money for the arts can engender.

Especially in jazz. Public support has helped the country's improvised-music scene expand from a handful of artists in the late '60s to a thriving network of recording, performing and educational opportunities today. It's not perfect, of course; I'll address some chinks in Norway's funding armor. But the country's improvised music flourishes largely on public support.

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Hi. I'm Tony Andrews and I am Contributing Editor / Jazz here. I hope you found the above interesting. If you want anything jazz-related published here (free of charge) then please email me at tonya.balgores@talktalk.net and/or you can leave a message on +44(0) 7734 816 345 and I'll see if it fits.  Thank you.

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