Music: Here Comes the Summer: The Undertones Story

Documentary about Northern Irish pop-punk band the Undertones. In 1978 the Undertones released Teenage Kicks, one of the most perfect and enduring pop records of all time – an adolescent anthem that spoke to teenagers all over the globe. It was the first in a string of hits that created a timeless soundtrack to growing […]

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Harmonia Mundi Lumieres

This 30 disc (29 music + 1 librettoes etc) box set is available from Harmonia Mundi via Amazon Marketplace for very silly money at the moment. MORE

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News: Do you own your digital content?

It used to be so easy: your photographs filled up boxes and albums; your CDs, books and films filled up shelves; your thoughts and ideas filled up notebooks and diaries, and when you died there were physical things to be distributed among your family and friends. Technology has changed the way we keep and share […]

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Sock puppetry and fake reviews: publish and be damned.

Editor preface. I read this, this morning and not for the first time wondered not if but rather for how long this has being going on in some audiophile forums? I remain deeply, deeply suspicious of any forum poster using a pseudonym rather than their full name. Try substituting ‘equipment’ for ‘book’ in the following […]

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Pet Shop Boys: ‘We don’t think about the old stuff’

After 30 years in the limelight, the Pet Shop Boys are tackling an unusual subject for a pop album – ageing and death. The Pet Shop Boys are sprawled at opposite ends of a sofa in a perfectly white room on the top floor of their record company’s London headquarters. Neil Tennant, professor of pop […]

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Dan Allan writes: “I Just Don’t Get… Muse”

Having read John Clarke’s elegantly-written, though fundamentally blasphemous, tirade against my beloved Smiths, I thought that as soon as calmed myself down a bit, I would indulge in some scathing iconoclasm of my own. Because there is one band that I have consistently disliked since the first time their fingernail-sounds scratched down the tonally-sensitive blackboard […]

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Music For The Mind: The Psychology Of Music

According to British psychologist Glenn Wilson, music plays a very central role in the lives of people and is ranked highly among pleasures including sex, food and drink. Aside from the enjoyment of listening to tunes or composing symphonies, studies show that music of all genres can have a great impact on both the physical […]

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Music debate: My desert island Classical Discs.

“I have a love hate relationship with classical music. My first certificate was in Vocal Production and for many years it was all I lived for, being the greatest Bass Singer… anyway, as time went on I became disenchanted with the genre(classical) and especially the fans and !!singers!! but there are times when it hits […]

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Small Data: Is lots of vinyl being sold?

Much has been made of the fact that more than a million vinyl albums have been sold this year, but is that a lot, asks Anthony Reuben. Everybody’s becoming familiar with a particular story about how people buy their music. CDs killed vinyl. CDs were in turn at least partly killed by downloads. But then […]

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Yo Yo Ma – where to start?

Having only heard the ‘Inspired by Bach’ CD plus whatever I’ve heard on the odd movie soundtrack, I was wondering if anyone can give me any pointers towards other albums to start with? There’s obviously the enormous 90 CD box set available but it seems quite a big leap for someone who hasn’t heard much, […]

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Rock Around the Clock: story of a hit song

Martin Chilton writes: It’s rather funny to think that it was a middle-aged man who wrote the lyrics that stirred up a generation of teenagers in the Fifites. When Philadelphia-born Max C Friedman penned the words ‘One, Two, Three O’clock, Four O’clock rock’ as the opening line of a novelty number, he’d have had no […]

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Do these 10 songs represent modern Britain?

BBC Radio 2 has chosen these 10 songs as ‘the soundtrack to British culture’ – from Dame Vera Lynn to Amy Winehouse and The Shamen. One is a wartime classic sung by a Forces Sweetheart. The other is an anthem to addiction and wasted talent.According to BBC Radio 2, We’ll Meet Again by Dame Vera […]

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